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Queer Sexual Health & Resources

For many of us, the kind of sex education we had when we were younger was not queer or trans inclusive. For example, we may have only learned about condoms in relation to preventing pregnancy in the context of heterosexual sex. But pregnancy prevention might also apply to trans men, and there are many other sexual barriers, including gloves and dental dams, both in latex and non-latex options. It is sometimes hard to find information on how or why to use gloves and how to use (not to mention, where to buy) dental dams.

As a company, Pink & White Productions encourages models to have the hottest, safest sex they want to have. We provide several different kinds of safer sex barriers and lubricants, and can provide specific brands at request for models. We generally keep the lube and barrier application shown in our movies, as a natural part of the sex scene. The benefits of this is that viewers see the mechanics of how safer sex is practiced, what it’s like to put on gloves, take a break to apply lube, and other actions that makes sex safe and fun. Our models take full responsibility for their sexual health, and we hope to provide them with as many options as we can, whether they choose to get tested, use barriers, have low-risk sex, or any combination. Please note that some people may use different names for their sexual anatomy than the words used on this page, we'll try to use commonly understood vocabulary, and will commit to keeping this page updated as we go.

QUEER SEX HEALTH QUICKIE

While ALL sex is risky, low-no risk sex includes things like: Kissing on the Mouth, Mutual Masturbation, and Dry Humping (grinding your genitals against someone else while wearing clothing, or rubbing someone's genitals over clothes).

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) refer to many different viruses and bacterial infections. Some of the most common include Chlamydia, Herpes, Gonorrhea, HPV (genital warts), and Syphilis. Infections can be spread even if no symptoms are visible, and you can be infected without knowing it. With higher risk sex, transmission is spread when one person’s vaginal fluids, ejaculate, cum, semen, pre-cum, blood and menstrual blood or breast milk, enter the bloodstream through an open wound, or, absorb through the mucous membranes of the body (such as via the vagina, throat, and anus).

Partners should be tested and treated to avoid transmission and further health risks, including being more susceptible to HIV. To play it safe, get a regular STI check up if you might be at risk, even if you haven't shown any signs of symptoms. Always discuss your known STI status with sexual partners, and consider practicing safer sex via barriers with your current and potential partners. Make sure your hands, mouth, and genitals do not have any open wounds, and keep nails trimmed or filed, or for longer nails, use gloves padded with cotton balls. If you're concerned with your breath, chew gum rather than flossing or brushing your teeth if it's within the hour before sex. Wash yourself thoroughly with soap and water before any mouth to anal contact. Vaginal douche is unnecessary, but if you prefer it please use warm water only because harsh chemicals can actually increase your risk by breaking the internal tissues. You can use dental dams (or even saran wrap -- make sure it's not the perforated, microwavable kind -- for oral sex and gloves for sex with your hands. Finally, condoms work great on shared toys.

It's also a good idea to keep hydrated and to remember to pee before and after sex as it can help eliminate bacteria and viruses from your urethra, preventing some minor but uncomfortable bladder infection and BV.

SAFER SEX IS SEXY!

Don't let anyone tell you that you shouldn't protect yourself just because they don't like using barriers. Though it can be awkward at first, barriers can become familiar with practice and can become a normal part of sex. Ultimately, having consensual sex, where partners are informed and engaged, creates the best possible scenario for satisfying, healthful sex.

STD/STI TESTING RESOURCES

Going to the doctor can be intimidating for queer and/or trans people who may encounter doctors and nurse practitioners who are unfamiliar and often uneducated about our gender and sexual health needs.

While performers may be fluid-bonded or have monogamous sexual partners, regular testing and check-ups can help keep you healthy and may provide early detection of potential health concerns. Those who would like to get tested can find the following Bay Area businesses helpful. Please note: it's important to remember that not all testing facilities use the preferred ELISA test which detects HIV antibodies in your blood for a shorter window period. The only facilities approved by the Adult Performer Advocacy Committee are Talent Testing Service and Cutting Edge Testing, which operate under the PASS system.

  • Lyon-Martin Health Services – personalized healthcare and support services to cis and trans women and transgender men who lack access to quality care because of their sexual or gender identity, regardless of their ability to pay.
  • St. James Infirmary – offers free, confidential, nonjudgmental medical and social services for female, transgender, and male sex workers. They are the first occupational safety and health clinic for sex workers run by-and-or sex workers.
  • Talent Testing Service) – Adult Industry Testing Facility at a number of locations.
  • Cutting Edge Tests - Adult Industry Testing Facility at a number of locations.
  • Your health care provider – if you have health insurance, please schedule an appointment with your provider.
    OraQuil -- affordable over the counter HIV test.

ONLINE & HOTLINE RESOURCES

A Holistic Approach
Check out Freeing Ourselves: A guide to Health and Self Love for Brown Bois.

Sex Ed Books
While there's a lot of great books out there, we like to recommend Girl Sex 101, a sex-ed book with helpful info for ladies and lady-lovers of all genders and identities. It's queer focused and trans inclusive and covers everything from consent to squirting to muffing, with advice by CrashPad performers Tobi Hill-Meyer, Jiz Lee, Tina Horn, Papí Coxxx, Nina Hartley, and Sophia St. James. [Available on online and paperback.]

Truvada as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
Here's information about PrEP and Truvada.

Some Trans Sex PDF Guides

SEXUAL RISK CHART
Here is a clear chart of the likelihood of disease transmission with various types of sex.

If Your Partner is Infected

KNOWN RISKS

POSSIBLE RISKS

UNKNOWN

You give oral sex to their penis
You give oral sex to their vulva none
You receive oral sex on your penis none
You receive oral sex on your vulva none
You penetrate anally with your penis none
You receive anal sex from their penis none
You use your penis for vaginal sex none
You engage in Penis-Vaginal sex, with your vagina none
Oral-anal Sex none

* You could be at risk if the receiver has just topped someone else.

** Very low risk.

*** Unprotected anal sex is a very high risk activity for a bottom, much more so than for a top. The risk of HIV transmission to a bottom during unprotected anal sex is 15 in 1,000 versus 3 in 10,000 from a bottom to a top.

  • Kissing, mutual masturbation, and frottage or dry humping are considered safer sex activities, with little to no risk of STD transmission.
  • Using latex condoms (male or female) significantly reduces the risk of contracting STDs during anal, vaginal and oral sex.
  • Washing hands and the genital area thoroughly before and after oral-anal sex reduces the risk of transmission of most of the listed STDs and conditions. Condom use reduces transmission risk even further.

Source: SF City Clinic.

Info sent by Metis Black of Tantus Inc: “HPV isn’t an unknown for oral sex- 35% of the throat cancer in men is from HPV and rising.” [source: Wall Street Journal" Throat Cancer Linked to Virus"]


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